Horizon



Aired every other Sunday night at 10 PM from October 13, 1963 to August 30, 1964.

This 60 minute program alternated with Let's Face It and Question Mark in the Sunday night timeslot that was later filled by This Hour Has Seven Days. The editorial content was mixed, but essentially news-based public affairs subject material. Jim Guthro and John Kennedy supervised the production.

The series featured a number of different documentaries from CBC News, including:

The Presumption of Innocence with Frank McGee; Denizens of Outer Space with Lister Sinclair; Another Canada with J. Frank Willis looked at poverty, while This Time This Place offered insight into the lives of Quebec singers.

James Murray, who later produced The Nature of Things, made his debut with a documentary on endangered species called And Then There Were None. Subsequent docs in the second season included a look at the Communist Party of Canada, and Pablo Picasso and The Age of Renewal which looked at Christianity in the world. But perhaps Horizon is best known for a special Easter broadcast in 1964: The Open Grave. It was produced and directed by Ron Kelly and written by Charles Israel. It was the fictional story of a young radical who disappears from his grave.

The series continued with a variety of documentaries about science, history and politics.

Written by John Corcelli - May, 2005