Nova Scotia

CKWM-FM (Magic 94.9), Kentville

, Maritime Broadcasting System Ltd.

Evangeline Broadcasting Ltd., owner of CKEN-AM, opened CKEN-FM on March 14, operating on 97.7 MHz with effective radiated power of 18,000 watts.

CKEN-FM became CKWM-FM (the new calls were already in use in 1970).

Approval was granted for the transfer of 66% of Evangeline Broadcasting Co. from the estate of A. M. Bishop to W. A. Bishop.

On May 22, the sale of Evangeline Broadcasting Co. Ltd. (CKEN, CKWM-FM, CKAD, CKDY, CFAB) by W. A. Bishop, Scotian Gold Co-op Ltd., F. Hugh Burns, May & Paul Davidson, Bella Burns, George C. Baker, David J. Waterbury, E. J. MacMillan, D. MacDonald, K.L. Crowell, H.L. Dean and Frances B. Lindsay to Neil H. MacMullen, on behalf of a company to be incorporated (would be known as Annapolis Valley Radio Ltd.) was approved. Annapolis took ownership on June 26.

CKWM-FM received approval to become a full-time affiliate of the CBC Stereo (FM) network. It was very unusual for CBC Stereo to have private affiliates.

After leasing its facilities to the CBC for a five year period, CKWM-FM invested in new facilities, hired new staff, and switched to a soft rock format on September 1. The CBC was not happy and claimed it had a further option on 50 hours a week for another two years. On August 29, the CRTC told CKWM that its new format could take effect only after an agreement had been reached to ensure continued CBC Stereo service. The decision came too late and CKWM had already adopted its new format.

CKWM-FM applied to the CRTC for a new condition of licence which would see the station provide 48 hours a week of CBC Stereo programming until August 31, 1988. The proposal offered a solution to the conflict between Annapolis Valley Radio and the CBC which came to a head on September 1.

Richard Collicut was news director at Magic 97.

CKWM had to make the hours of 7 p.m. to midnight available to the CBC-FM six nights a week. The station offered a light rock format during the day and classical music at night.

On September 1, CKWM disaffiliated from the CBC Stereo network and began producing local programs on a full-time basis. The CBC opened its own stereo transmitter.

CKWM had its licence renewed to September 30, 1992 and was told to adhere to its promise of performance, particularly its music format and foreground programming.

The CRTC approved the sales of Kentville-based Annapolis Valley Radio Ltd. to Halifax-based Maritime Broadcasting System Ltd. AVR operated CFAB Windsor, CKEN and CKWM-FM Kentville, CKAD Middleton, CKDY Digby and CKDY-FM-1 Weymouth. Maritime Broadcasting president Merv Russell said the deal for AVR would close April 30. Diane Best-Redden would be general manager of the AVR stations.

Maritime Broadcasting closed its deal for the purchase of Neil MacMullen's Annapolis Valley Radio on April 30, then did the same thing all over again on May 1 for the purchase of Fundy Broadcasting's CJCB/CKPE-FM Sydney and CFBC/C98-FM Saint John.

Tom Bedell left Magic 97 as music director to host the afternoon drive show on Q104 (CFRQ) Halifax.

The corporate name changed from Annapolis Valley Radio Ltd. to Maritime Broadcaasting System Ltd.

On January 10,  CKWM “Magic 97” moved to 94.9 MHz as “Magic 94-9”. Sister station CKEN moved from the AM dial to the 94.9 FM frequency. 

Willard A. Bishop, founder of CKEN-CKWM and Annapolis Valley Broadcasting, passed away January 15 at age 78. Among his accomplishments: creating the country’s first FM network, linking CKWM with CKTO in Truro.

On December 26 at 12:00 a.m. CKWM-FM Magic 94.9 adjusted its format to take in a larger audience. It had found that a large number of 35-54 year olds could be better served by the station. CKWM decided to broaden the music and on-air content to capture this group while keeping its existing listeners. Their new slogan states - "We Play Everything".

Studios and offices are noted as being at 29 Oakdene Avenue.

                                                Written by Bill Dulmage - Updated November, 2010