CJLS-FM

CJLS-FM , Y95.5, Yarmouth

Acadia Broadcasting

StationYearFreq.PowerOwner/Info
CJLS-FM
2003
95.5
18,000
Radio CJLS Ltd.
CJLS-AM
1934
1310
100 watts
Gateway Broadcasting Ltd (Laurie Smith)
1934

Gateway Broadcasting Co., owned by Laurie L. Smith, opened CJLS on April 1. CJLS broadcast on 1310 kHz with a power of 100 watts. Studios and transmitter were located on the top floor of the Grand Hotel. (LS in the calls: Laurie Smith)

1939

CJLS was now available through CBC as a supplementary station for acceptance of commercial programs. Fin Hollinger was appointed commercial manager. He had worked in the past as a sports announcer and program producer at CJKL Kirkland Lake.

1940

CJLS moved its studios and offices to 222 Main Street. A new 100 foot tower was built at the Brooklyn transmitter site. Elsie Allen was publicity director. Ron Fraser was news editor. Fin Hollinger, commercial and merchandising director at CJLS since 1939, left for WHLD in Niagara Falls to be promotions director. Richard Irvine succeeded him at CJLS as of May 15.

1941

Under the Havana Treaty, CJLS moved from 1310 to 1340 kHz (Class IV) on March 29. Power was 100 watts. Ron Fraser joined the CJLS staff. To meet growing demands for network time during the evenings, largely due to the war, the CBC set up a second network for commercial sponsorship. The network's first sponsor (on an experimental basis) was the Gillette Safety Razor Co. The Mutual Broadcasting System originated boxing events for 26 Canadian stations through the CBC, plus the MBS affiliate - CKLW Windsor. The second network had 23 Canadian stations with alternative stations in Montreal to meet local conditions there. The new network would operate only after 6:00 p.m. Eastern Time. Over the past year, private stations had been anxious to have such a network - outside of CBC control. However, under the Radio Act, the CBC had full control over all networks in the country. It was felt that a full second network with full day and night programming was not feasible or economically possible at this time. CBC-owned stations affiliated with the new network: CBK Watrous, CBA Sackville and CBY Toronto. Privately-owned stations affiliated with the new network were: CJOR Vancouver, CHWK Chilliwack, CFCN Calgary, CFRN Edmonton, CJRM Regina, CJGX Yorkton, CJRC Winnipeg, CKCA Kenora, CJIC Sault Ste Marie, CKOC Hamilton, CKTB St. Catherines, CFPL London, CFCO Chatham, CKLW Windsor, CKCR Kitchener, CKCO Ottawa, CFCF or CHLP Montreal, CHLT Sherbrooke, CKNB Campbellton, and CJLS Yarmouth.

1942

Richard Irvine signed with the RCAF. He had been commercial manager and chief announcer at CJLS for two years. His duties were taken over by Ronald C. Fraser. Dorothy Smith (Ball), director of women's programs left to live in Sydney.

1943

Ronald C. Fraser, formerly of CJLS, was appointed Maritimes regional farm commentator at CBC Halifax.

1945

Power increased to 250 watts. CBC Dominion Basic Stations: CJFX, CHNS, CFCY, CKCW, CKNB, CJLS, CKCO, CHOV, CFBR, CJBC, CHEX, CFPL, CFCO, CFPA, CHLT, CFCF, CKRC, CJGX, CKX, CKRM, CHAB, CFQC, CKBI, CFCN, CFRN, CJRL, CHWK, CJOR, CJVI. L.L. Smith was manager.

1948

CJLS received approval to operate an emergency transmitter.

1950

Laurie Smith, owner-manager of CJLS, died February 17. He was 50. The CBC Board approved the transfer of the CJLS licence from the estate of Laurie Smith to Gateway Broadcasting Co. Ltd. Gateway was now controlled by Laurie's wife, Jennie and sons, Donald and Malcom.

1955

Denny Comeau (Como) did news and sports.

1957

CJLS was a CBC Dominion affiliate and was operating on 1340 kHz with power of 250 watts. Ownership of Gateway Broadcasting Co. Ltd.: Donald L. Smith 60.4%, Mrs. Jennie R. Smith 39.2% and Malcolm J. Smith 0.4%. Donald L. Smith was president of the company, manager and commercial manager of CJLS.

1960

CJLS moved to 1340 kHz. Power remained at 250 watts.

1962

The Dominion and Trans-Canada networks merged into a single CBC radio service. CJLS became an independent after the merger.

1965

D. L. M. Smith was President of Gateway Broadcasting Co. Ltd. and manager of CJLS.

1968

On October 3, CJLS failed to have its licence renewed beyond the expiry date of March 31, 1969. The CRTC felt CJLS had not maintained minimum standards...one of the areas pointed to was news and public affairs. The Commission accused the station of suppressing news. Donald L. Smith, president of Gateway Broadcasting Co. Ltd. told the CRTC that he in the past and would continue in future to suppress certain news items and there were no plans to change this policy. The station was operated by Smith and staffed by his mother, brother and four others. The station was also only offering one hour and 20 minutes of live programming out of its total of 118 hours and 45 minutes of broadcasting per week. Gateway Broadcasting Co. Ltd. had until the licence expiry date to find a new owner for the station. On November 26, the CRTC approved the sale of CJLS following an earlier decision not to renew the station's licence due to poor programming and the previous owner's admission of the suppression of news. Gateway Broadcasting Co. Ltd. would be sold to a group of local businessmen represented by Leland G. Trask, who would form a company to be incorporated (CJLS Ltd.). As a condition of licence, CJLS would have to continue on as part of the CBC network.

1969

On July 25, CJLS was authorized to move from 1340 kHz with power of 250 watts (omnidirectional) to 580 kHz with power of 1,000 (directional) from a new transmitters site. CJLS changed its plans to move to 580 kHz and on October 23, the CRTC approved the station’s application ro remain on 1340 kHz, but increase power from 250 watts (omnidirectional) to 5,000 watts dayand 1,000 watts night (directional). CJLS increased power to 5,000 watts day and 1,000 watts night from a three tower array at a new transmitter site, located at Overton.

1982

On July 27, the transfer of a 67% interest in Radio CJLS Ltd. was approved. The shares would move from Leland G. Trask (40%) and Michael L. Trask (27%) to M. L. Trask Holdings Ltd. As a result, M. L. increased its holding from 6% to 73%. This holding company (M. L.) was 98% controlled by Michael L. Trask. The remaining 27% of Radio CJLS Ltd. would continue to be held by Bruce D. Raymond.

1984

CJLS added FM repeaters at Barrington Passage (96.3 MHz – 5,500 watts) and New Tusket (93.5 MHz - 3,000 watts). Wayne Leslie joined CJLS to begin his radio career. On December 13, CJLS was authorized to increase night-time power from 1,000 watts to 4,000 watts.

1986

Wayne Leslie, with CJLS for two years, became morning man.

1987

Andy Newman left CJLS to be morning man at CIGO Port Hawkesbury. Ray Zinck was news director.

1989

Morning man Wayne Leslie left CJLS to take over the afternoon show at CKCQ Quesnel.

1995

CJLS morning man Bruce Rainnie moved to CBHT-TV in Halifax.

1998

On Canada Day, Ray Zinck and partners Gerry Boudreau and Chris Perry (Radio CJLS Ltd.) closed on their deal to purchase CJLS. CJLS received recognition from Nova Scotia's legislature on the first day of the fall sitting. The resolution, which passed unanimously, asked the House of Assembly to congratulate the new owners and praised the station for promoting Nova Scotia music and culture.

2002

On December 18, CJLS was given approval to convert to the FM band, operating on 95.5 MHz with an effective radiated power of 18,000 watts. Rebroadcasters CJLS-FM Barrington CJLS-FM-1 New Tusket would continue to operate. The new station offered the existing format consisting of a mixture of top 40 hits, songs from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s and a selection of music from popular East Coast performers.

2003

On February 1, Gerry Boudreau retired. His partners in Radio CJLS Ltd., Chris Perry and Ray Zinck purchased his shares (each holding 50%). In June, CJLS began operating on 95.5 MHz in Yarmouth. The tower was located at Tusket. CJLS-AM left the air a short time later.

2004

CJLS was given approval to operate a low-power rebroadcast transmitter at Yarmouth to resolve signal deficiencies caused by rough terrain surrounding the Tusket Falls site of the originating transmitter. The rebroadcaster would operate on 94.7 MHz with effective radiated power of 50 watts.

2011

On August 31, the CRTC administratively renewed the licence for CJLS-FM and its transmitters CJLS-FM-1 New Tusket, CJLS-FM-2 Barrington and CJLS-FM-3 Yarmouth until March 31, 2012. The CRTC approved the change to the ownership of Radio CJLS Limited through the transfer of Radio CJLS shares from Ray E. Zinck and Christopher R. Perry to their respective holding company. This transaction did not affect the effective control of Radio CJLS, which continued to be jointly exercised by Zinck and Perry. Radio CJLS was the licensee of CJLS-FM Yarmouth, and its transmitters CJLS-FM-1 New Tusket, CJLS-FM-2 Barrington and CJLS-FM-3 Yarmouth.

2012

On March 20, the CRTC administratively renewed the licence for CJLS-FM Yarmouth and its transmitters CJLS-FM-1 New Tusket, CJLS-FM-2 Barrington and CJLS-FM-3 Yarmouth to August 31, 2012. On August 28, the licence was administratively renewed to December 31, 2012. On December 21, the CRTC renewed the licence to August 31, 2017.

2015

It was announced in the fall that Radio CJLS Ltd. would be sold to Acadia Broadcasting. CJLS Owner/partners Ray Zinck and Chris Perry planned to retire. They purchased the station in 1998 but both had been with the station since the early 1970's.

2016

In the spring, the CRTC approved the application by Acadia Broadcasting to acquire CJLS from Chris Perry and Ray Zinck. The two had been involved with the station since the early 1970s, and bought it in 1998. Zinck and Perry announced their retirement last fall.

On September 16 at 1:04 p.m., CJLS changed its branding from The Wave to Y95.5. The Adult Contemporary format remained in place.

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